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J.Y. Cousteau - Famous Quotes

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"The Sea, once it casts its spell, holds one in it's net of wonder forever." Never before and since (with exception of BBC2's - Blue Planet's Sir David Attenborough ) has one man been so influential as the late Commandant Cousteau in taking us onto his exploration voyages around the Sea's and Oceans of the world. He has shown the intricate secrets of the Oceans to millions, if not billions and still does till today. But he has also showed us 'humanity' and it's behavior on the environment, sometimes even in first person. I got to know about Cousteau's world through the works of 'Didi' Frederic Dumas - Le Monde du Silence. At age 10 I moved to the North Sea and from then on the Sea and I became inseparable; due to this passion the man had instilled in me. Many continents and Oceans later (I am now 47) I...
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It’s Not Too Late to Save Coral Reefs

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Our strategy centers on empowering and collaborating with those on the frontlines of reef conservation. Our Reef Resilience Network , for example, connects marine resource managers around the world and provides information and training opportunities to maximize conservation and restoration efforts. Similarly, our work with fishermen in the Caribbean , the Solomon Islands and other regions is also demonstrating that a more sustainable approach to fishing sustains reef ecosystems and in turn leads to better fishing yields in the long term. Well-managed, healthy reefs are proving more resilient to the wider effects of climate change. But we're also finding more unlikely allies in the business community. The tourism industry offers a good example. Globally, the tourism industry derives $36 billion in annual revenue from coral reefs; the Conservancy's Mapping Ocean Wealth initiative is helping to identify where and how reefs generate tourism's value and offering more incentives for conservation. And one...
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Antarctic ice sheet loses area the size of London from base, say scientists

A region of ice the size of Greater London vanished from the edge of  Antarctica  between 2010 and 2016, a new British-led study has shown. The 1,463 square kilometres of underwater ice at the base of the Antarctic ice sheet melted under the influence of warm ocean water currents. Scientists demonstrated how the massive ice sheet is retreating as its edges, fed by a multitude of glaciers, are eroded. The discovery emerged from satellite tracking of the ice sheet's "grounding line", the boundary where the ice sheet's base leaves the sea floor and begins to float. Grounding lines typically lie a kilometre or more below the ocean surface and are inaccessible even to deep diving submersibles. Original link Original author: Press
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A New Species Of Shark Discovered In The Atlantic Ocean - And It's Freaking Adorable

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Despite having evolved some 250 million years ago, sixgill sharks are still some of the most mysterious creatures living in the oceans. So elusive are these deep-sea predators that researchers have only just figured out that there is a new species  living in the Atlantic. Sixgill sharks are unusual among sharks for being the only extant species to have an extra pair of gill slits (while a few others have yet another pair still). The sixgills have long been split into two species – the bluntnose sixgill shark (Hexanchus griseus) that can live 2,500 meters (8,200 feet) beneath the surface and the bigeye sixgill shark (Hexanchus nakamurai) that is smaller and tends to live closer to the surface, although still out of the reach of most biologists.   The bigeye sixgill has been found in most major oceans, and until now was considered a single species. But a new paper reveals that the sharks...
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15 March 2017
I can just see Cousteau the father of diving turning in the grave. After the disastrous management of the Calypso by the late captain's last wife, now the last bastion of Cousteau's legacy Aqualung ha...
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14 May 2017
Aerial View of the Kodiak Queen with the Kracken. Image Owen Buggy. What if… … a WWII warship could mobilize a global network of researchers, philanthropists and artists to solve marine health problem...
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05 May 2017
A killer whale found dead on the West Coast of Scotland had the highest level of a class of banned chemicals in her blubber of any animal ever reported in the UK. The killer whale, known as Lulu, was ...
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